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Thomas Cumpston page 2

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1682-1819

 

Name: Thomas Cumpston Residence: Philadelphia, PA Description: Executor

Date: 16 Sep 1803 Prove Date: 30 Jun 1808 Book Page: 2:318

 

Remarks: Elizabeth Locke. City of Philadelphia. Widow. Estate, real and personal, to sister Sarah Evans, excepting the following legacies: To nephews Isachar Evans and Robert Towers Evans, niece Sarah Evans. Black man Thomas Locke, black woman named Amy. Exec: Sister Sarah Evans and friends Thomas Cumpston of Philadelphia and Nathan Potts of Norristown. Letters granted to Thomas Cumpston and Sarah Evans.

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Name: Thomas Cumpston Residence: Philadelphia, PA Description: Friend

Date: 16 Sep 1803 Prove Date: 30 Jun 1808 Book Page: 2:318

Remarks: Elizabeth Locke. City of Philadelphia. Widow. Estate, real and personal, to sister Sarah Evans, excepting the following legacies: To nephews Isachar Evans and Robert Towers Evans, niece Sarah Evans. Black man Thomas Locke, black woman named Amy. Exec: Sister Sarah Evans and friends Thomas Cumpston of Philadelphia and Nathan Potts of Norristown. Letters granted to Thomas Cumpston and Sarah Evans.

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Name: Thomas Cumpston Residence: Philadelphia, PA Description: Executor

Prove Date: 13 Nov 1804 Title: Merchant Book Page: 1:257

Remarks: Michael Roberts. City of Philadelphia. Merchant. Estate to be divided, according to the Laws of Penna. amongst his wife and children. Exec. to be guardian of his children, names not given. Exec: Thomas Cumpston, mercht. of Philadelphia, Joseph Williams of the Bank of U.S. and wife Francis Roberts. Joseph Mort of Philadelphia, gentleman, affirmed.

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Name: Thomas Cumpston Residence: Philadelphia, PA Description: Guardian

Prove Date: 13 Nov 1804 Title: Merchant Book Page: 1:257

Remarks: Michael Roberts. City of Philadelphia. Merchant. Estate to be divided, according to the Laws of Penna. amongst his wife and children. Exec. to be guardian of his children, names not given. Exec: Thomas Cumpston, mercht. of Philadelphia, Joseph Williams of the Bank of U.S. and wife Francis Roberts. Joseph Mort of Philadelphia, gentleman, affirmed.

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Name: Thomas Cumpston Residence: Philadelphia, PA Description: Executor

Date: 14 Nov 1800 Prove Date: 24 Jan 1803 Title: Merchant Book Page: 1:68

Remarks: Sarah Preston. City of Philadelphia. Widow. All estate to Jane Harrison of Philadelphia, spinster. Exec: Thomas Cumpston of Philadelphia, merchant.

 

 

From Google books

 

On the 3d February, 1837, Judge Hopkinson delivered the following opinion on the petition :  Robert Morris's Estate, in Bankruptcy.

 

On the 28th day of July, 1801, a commission of bankruptcy was issued by the District Judge for the Pennsylvania District, against Robert Morris, directed to John Hallowell, Joseph Hopkinson, and Thomas Cumpston, Commissioners. The bankrupt being duly summoned, surrendered himself to the commissioners, and submitted himself to be examined; the commissioners having previously declared the said Robert Morris a bankrupt. On the 6th day of August the commissioners received proof of sundry debts. On the 26th of August proof of debts was received from about twenty-one creditors: and the choice of assignees postponed until the 12th day of September.

 

http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA83&sig=UE6HXZI2h7czYwmhu-1wzEzldq4&id=yv87AAAAIAAJ&output=text

Philadelphia, July 26th, 1797.  THOMAS CUMPSTON

 

The subscribers of the foregoing address were the same with those which have subscribed this representation and petition to the Legislature.

 

On the subject of the foregoing address the Common Council of the city have determined, "That being strongly impressed with the laudable design of the petitioners, the existence of the evil complained of, and its pernicious effects, they have given all the consideration in their power to the representations of the petitioners, and lament that while they have every inclination to afford the relief prayed for, they feel themselves wanting in the power."

 

The address to the Magistrate was as follows:  "To the Mayor, Recorder, Aldermen, and Magistrates of the city and liberties of Philadelphia.

 

The memorial and representation of a committee appointed by delegates of the churches and congregations of Christ Church, St. Peter's, St. Paul's, the German Lutheran, German Reformed, Methodist, Third Presbyterian, Catholic, St. Mary's, Baptist, Associate, Free Quakers, Scotch Presbyterian, African, Second Presbyterian, Moravian and Swedes, worshipping Almighty God in the city and liberties aforesaid,  RESPECTFULLY SHEWETH,

That the different churches, and religious societies whom they represent are greatly aggrieved and distressed by the numerous and flagrant violations of an existing law of this state, made for the suppression of vice and immorality.

 

Your memorialists state that, in direct transgression of the said law, the public stages do constantly enter and depart from this city as freely and frequently on the Lord's day as on any other day of the week, to the general disturbance and shameful violation of the religious rest to which that day is consecrated, and even to the interruption of the worship of God in several public assemblies near which the said stages pass:

 

That numerous other carriages of every description, by going from and returning to the city on said day, do also interrupt many of the assemblies for religious worship, and convert the city into a scene of incessent noise, confusion and disorder:

 

That amendments have been publicly advertised for the Lord's day and admission to them offered at a reduced price, with a view to entice the young and unthinking to violate their duty both to God and man:

 

That children and youth are allowed to engage in the public streets and on the commons near the city in the most boisterous and unlawful sports and diversions, to use the most prophane and unseemly language, and by going into the river to bathe near one of the assemblies for religious worship, not only to offend against all law, but to disregard and violate all the sentiments of decency, and to bring reproach on the manners and civilization of the city.

 

That houses of ill-fame and places of lewd resort are permitted to exist, with a publicity that is alike injurious to the virtue and disgraceful to the character of our city:

 

That many taverns and other places of public entertainment, by keeping open house on the Lord's day, and at other times by permitting unlawful games, riotous practices, and drinking to intoxication, trangress the design of their license, essentially injure the morals of the community, and greatly disturb the peace of the inhabitants:

 

Your memorialists are at a loss to conceive how these and many other contraventions and evasions of the act for the prevention of vice and immorality, (passed by the legislature of the state, shortly after our city had been delivered from that awful visitation of heaven, by which thousands were suddenly swept into eternity) can have passed unnoticed and unpunished by those who are set to enforce the laws. Your memorialists cannot conceive that it is reasonable to expect that private individuals should incur the odium and the persecution resulting from becoming informers, in regard to actions which are so public

that no eye can avoid beholding them, and so offensive that they force themselves on the notice of every sense and feeling. To refuse, in such cases as these, to execute the law, unless individuals become informers and prosecutors, will ever prove in effect an evasion of it.

 

Your memorialists state these facts and sentiments to the magistrates of the city and liberties, with the most unreserved freedom - not from any want of respect to their persons and offices, but because the nature and importance of the subject forbids them to present it in any equivocal language, or under any indecisive aspect. The enormities are notorious and disgraceful, and in every lawful way we are determinately set on obtaining their suppression and removal. We speak in behalf of that part of the community (it is not vanity to assert it) which best deserves encouragement and protection; and we confidently trust that the justice of our cause will induce the guardians of the city to pursue such active and vigorous measures as will speedily remove the evils of which we complain.

 

That a written answer to this address should be returned by the magistrates was, from the nature of the case, not to be expected. But your petitioners are assured by the committee who presented it, that the mayor of the city, after expressing it as his sincere and strong desire that he might be instrumental in suppressing the disorders which form the subject of complaint, and after consulting the recorder on the nature and extent of the law by which his agency was to be directed and sanctioned, had stated to the committee that the said law was, in several respects, greatly defective.

 

On the whole, then, it appears by what your petitioners have now submitted to the legislature, that the corporation of the city esteem their powers insufficient to authorize the religious assemblies to extend chains across the streets, during the hours of worship on the Lord's day; and that the magistrates find themselves circumscribed in their endeavours to prevent and punish vice and disorder, by the imperfections of the law under which they are called to act.

 

Your petitioners, therefore, most earnestly entreat the legislature of the State, either to pass an act immediately granting to the religious societies the right to protect themselves from disturbance, and interruption by the method already specified, or else so to enlarge the powers of the city corporation, as that this privilege may be granted by them. The justice and propriety of such a measure your petitioners believe to be fully and incontrovertibly shown in their representation to the corporation already recited; and this idea, it will be observed, is recognized and acknowledged in the answer of the common council.

 

Your petitioners, also, pray that the law for the suppression of vice and immorality may be revised, and its imperfections supplied - In particular that the penalties to be incurred for violating the Lord's day, for profane cursing and swearing, and for sending or accepting a challenge to a duel, may be increased. These penalties are such, at present, that those who attempt to execute the law, sometimes find themselves held in contempt by the party offending, and the sanction of the law professedly set at defiance. For the inhuman practice of duelling, which your petitioners are sorry to observe has lately become frequent and fashionable, it is proposed and requested that confinement at hard labour should, as in other cases of attempting or destroying the lives of citizens, constitute a part of the punishment; and this the rather, as a disgraceful punishment seems best adapted to suppress those sentiments of false honour, from which the detestable custom of duelling proceeds.

 

Your petitioners farther and earnestly pray, that, in supplying the defects of law aforesaid, the travelling of stages on the Lord's day, and all travelling for recreation, amusement, or worldly business, not included in the exception which permits acts of necessity and mercy, may be explicitly and particularly prohibited. - The importance of this will obviously occur, if the sanctifying of the Sabbath be really intended to be enjoined and secured by a legal provision.

 

Your petitioners are sorry to have made so large a demand on the time of the legislature as is done by the length of this petition. But they are consoled with the thought that this time has not been consumed by an unimportant subject, but in attending to the claims of virtue and piety, which constitute the radical principles of all social happiness, and without a regard to which no society can long exist. The same consideration induces your petitioners fervently to hope that the prayer of their petition will be granted, and your petitioners, as in duty bound, will ever pray.

THOMAS CUMPSTON - Christ Church and St. Peter's.

JOSEPH DELAVARE - St. Paul's.

WILLIAM SHEAFF - German Lutheran.

JACOB LAWERSWYLER - German Reformed.

JOHN MEDER - Moravian.  JOHN DICKINS - Methodist.  GEORGE MEADE - Catholic Church St. Mary's.  THOMAS USTIC, WILLIAM ROGERS, SALLOWS SHEWELL,

MATHEW RANDALL, - Baptist Society.  JOHN MCCULLOCH - Associate.

JEHU ELDREDGE, GEORGE KEMBLE, SAMUEL WETHERILL - Free Quakers.

JOSEPH MAGOFFIN, ROBERT AITKIN - Scotch Presbyterian.

ABSALOM JONES,