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Cumbria Marriage - Jenny Ann CRUMPSTON & James WILSON of Lambrigg - (and more about Cowan Head)

Jenny Ann Crumpston married James Wilson of Lambrigg - he was brother to  Jane, the wife of Miles Scales of Lambrigg. Jenny was the daughter of George Cumpstone of Ambleside. There is a separate page Minute book of Grayrigg (Men's) Preparative Meeting WDFCF 1/8  1702-1828 which gives some insight into James' life

 

 

 

This information was kindly supplied by Trevor Littleton

 

Trevor has shared with me a full history of James Wilson.

We will be delighted to receive further information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

'Briefly, Isabella was the daughter of Miles Scales of Crosshouses in  Lambrigg

by Jane his wife who was the daughter of Isaac and Jane Wilson of The Green

in Lambrigg.

 

Jane Scales was the sister of James Wilson of Highgate, Kendal  who was Christopher Wilson's (Rigmaden & Abbot Hall) father in law, Thomas

Wilson, who married Margaret, the daughter of Thomas Ashburner, Paper

 Manufacturer of Cowen Head. (Thomas & Margaret's family inherited the Paper Mills before renting them out and subsequently selling them to James Cropper), and the

 Revd  John Wilson who built a house on Highgate which now houses the Conservative

Club.

 

There was also a sister Agnes who married William Rowlandson of  Bracken Hall

in Lambrigg.

 

Isabella had four siblings: Jane who married James Todd who became tenant at  

The Green under his wife's uncle, James Wilson (this is my line) and  William,

Isaac & Betty, all of whom died young.

 

Isabella's father, Miles was the son of William Scales of Birks in New  Hutton

by Elizabeth his wife, the daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Gathorne of Old

Hutton.

 

William Scales was the son of Edward Scales of Johnscales, p. Crosthwaite,  by

Eleanor, daughter of John Tarne of New Hutton.

 

The Wilson's and the Scales' were families of considerable importance around South Westmorland in the 17th & 18th centuries.  

 

 

Apprentices.

20/23   1755   WILSON James to Zach Hubbersty of Kirkby, Westd Attorney   £52 : 10

 

Extract from the Parish Registers of Grasmere:

1773   James Wilson of Lambrig in the parish of Kendal, Batchelor and Jenny Anne Cumpstone of this parish, Spinster were married in this Church by Licence this 28th day of January 1773 by me: Edw: Rowlandson, Curate.

This marriage was solemnized between us : Jas Wilson  Jenny Ann Cumpstone In the presence of : Geo: Cumpstone Agnes Myles

 

Extracts from the Registers of Grayrigg:

1773   Catherine ye dr of James and Jenny Ann Wilson of Lambrigg, baptized October 28th

1775   Jane ye dr of James and Jenny Ann Wilson of Lambrigg, baptized July 30th

1776   Jane dau: of James and Jenny Ann Wilson of Lambrigg, buried February 4th

1777   Barbara ye dau: of James and Jenny Ann Wilson of Lambrigg, baptized January 20th

1779   Jane Ann daughter of James and Jenny Ann Wilson of Lambrigg, baptized May 12th

1779   Jenny Ann wife of James Wilson of Lambrigg, buried November 11th

1782   Jenny Ann dau: of Mr James Wilson of Lambrigg, buried April 20th

 

Extracts from the Parish Registers of Kendal:

1783   James Wilson Esqr of Kendal of this parish, Widower and Mrs Rachel Strickland of Kendal, widow, were married in this Church by Licence 9th November 1783, by me: Thos. Symonds, Vicar.  This marriage was solemnized between us : Jas Wilson  Rachel Strickland  In the presence of :   D. Parker   James Fell

1806   Rachel wife of James Wilson Esq. aged 68 years, buried July 25th

1807   James Wilson Esq. of Highgate, aged 66 years, buried September 8th

Monumental Inscription in Kendal Parish Church.

 

Near this place lie the remains of James Wilson Esquire, one of his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the counties of Westmorland and Cumberland who died August XXVI, MDCCCVII in the LXVII year of his age. He was an able and active magistrate, a tender father and a sincere friend. His afflicted children as a small tho’ inadequate testimony of their affection to the most indulgent of parents have erected this monument to his memory.

 

Extract from The Athenaeum, 1807.

 

October : Died:  At St. Albans, aged 66 (while on his journey to visit a daughter in Kent) James Wilson Esq., of Kendal, one of his Majesty’s justices of the peace for Westmorland. As an active magistrate, zealous in the preservation of peace and good order, his death will be a public loss. His knowledge of the law, particularly in that department on which he was most engaged, was extensive; his impartiality in all his decisions was unquestionable, he was always ready to render every service in his power, and was equally accessible to the poor and the rich. In domestic and private life his friendly and social disposition made him much loved, and his death will be sincerely lamented.

James and Jenny Ann Wilson - their line, through their daughter Catherine, became one of the most influencial families in Westmorland!

 

It's interesting to note that James' brother, Thomas Wilson married Margaret Ashburner, daughter of Thomas Ashburner and sister of James Ashburner who amongst other enterprises, owned the Cowan Head Paper Mills.  (See photographs)

 

Burneside Paper Mill

From the article 'James Cropper Plc - the development of a modern paper manufacturer' by Duncan Hutt in The North West Mills Group Newsletter 45 (1995),

 

http://www.cumbria-industries.org.uk/cropper.htm

 

James Cropper Plc has been making paper at their Burneside mills (north of Kendal) since 1845, however the history of the site and its various uses can be traced back much further. It is known that there was a manorial corn mill at Burneside in the 13th century, and by 1334 it was worth 20 shillings. On the same race there was also a sharp edge or sickle mill and a fulling mill, and on the opposite bank was a fleecing mill. Both the corn mill and sickle mill were bought by the Wakefield family in about 1750. In 1760 John Wakefield built a woollen mill situated on what is now the reception car park of Croppers. This mill quickly became a very successful business bringing in about £2000 in the 1760's.

 

Following the success of the woollen mill John Wakefield set about a programme of expansion and change. He converted the sickle mill to a corn mill, and included a preparation plant for his newly built cotton mill in 1770. The cotton mill was extended with the new machinery after 1770 but proved to be uneconomic due to the competition from the Lancashire mills. To make matters worse the woollen mill lost trade with Yorkshire competition and, following their war of independence in 1776, also with the American market.

 

In 1828 the Wakefields leased the cotton mill to Hudson and Foster who installed a second-hand paper machine. The trio also installed a machine at the Cowan Head mill, a few miles upstream from Burneside.

 

Cowan Head Mill was also part of the Cropper's business complex until its closure in 1977. The history of the mill is a little less elaborate than that of Burneside. In 1735 it is known that a fulling mill existed in Cowan Head. Thomas Ashburner, a local publisher who started "The Kendal Weekly Mercury" (later "The Agreeable Miscellany"), bought the fulling mill in 1746 and converted it to make paper. James Ashburner took over the business and eventually the mill passed to the Wilson family.

 

In 1845 James Cropper rented the Burneside Mill from the Wakefield family, and the Cowan Head Mill from the Wilsons. In 1854 Cowan Head was bought, and in 1880 Bowston Mill, between Burneside and Cowan Head, was also purchased. Bowston Mill may well have begun life as a fulling mill, but a new building was constructed to prepare rags and ropes for the other two mills. Bowston Mill was closed in the early 1960s when waste paper rather than rags was used in the paper pulp.

 

The development of the Cropper's business was not without incident. In 1886 Burneside Mill was destroyed by fire. The cost of rebuilding was high and probably resulted in the freehold acquisition from the Wakefield family. A further incident occurred in 1893 when the Cowan Mill chimney blew down killing three workers.

 

The history of water power at the various sites is a long one. Water power was used in part of the process of paper manufacture at Cowan Head from 1750 to the early 1970s. In 1854 a Thompson's Patent Vortex Turbine was installed to replace the waterwheel. Alterations occurred in the 1930s, and two turbines were put in place which developed 110 and 200 horsepower. These turbines, however, did not provide sufficient power, and at a public enquiry in the 1970s the company failed to get reduced water charges from the water authority so the turbines were taken out of commission and alternative power was used. At Burneside there was a 300 hp turbine which was removed in about 1970 when the plant was modernised.

 

Other power was provided by the installation of Lancashire boilers in 1899 at Cowan Head, which were still in use in 1977. In 1919 a steam turbine was installed at Burneside which produced power for lighting the mill and provided electricity for the village. The possibility of supplying power to Kendal was also discussed but was ruled out. A Parsons turbine was installed in 1839 and a Metro Vickers in 1957. The Burneside plant currently uses a 6.5 Mw gas turbine. With the use of exhaust gases and a low pressure turbine a further 1 Mw is obtained.

 

The Cropper's paper business is now concentrated at Burneside, but when all three mills were in use the transport problem was solved by the construction of a narrow gauge tramway linking the sites in 1879. The tramway was replaced in 1927 by a standard gauge line, built using rails captured from the Turks in the First World War. This railway was linked to the Windermere - Oxenholme branch line. The line was operated originally by a petrol engine called 'Rachel' which was replaced by a diesel 'Rushton' in 1951. The railway brought in all the raw materials, including pulp, dyes, chemicals and coal, and sent out paper products. The line was closed between Burneside and Cowan Head in 1965, but the siding to Burneside was used for coal for a few more years.

 

James Cropper Plc currently produces a wide range of specialist paper products, supplying about 30% in rolls and 70% as sheets. Products include packaging boxes, coloured envelopes and paper, hardback book covers, watermarked and laid papers, printing and writing papers.

 

FURTHER READING

The leaves we write on - James Cropper, a history in paper making : Mark Cropper, Ellergreen Press, 2004

 

Burneside Paper Mill

From the article 'James Cropper Plc - the development of a modern paper manufacturer' by Duncan Hutt in The North West Mills Group Newsletter 45 (1995), by kind permission of the author and publisher

 

http://www.cumpston.org.uk/#/jenny-cumpston-marriage/4538597646

 

James Cropper Plc has been making paper at their Burneside mills (north of Kendal) since 1845, however the history of the site and its various uses can be traced back much further. It is known that there was a manorial corn mill at Burneside in the 13th century, and by 1334 it was worth 20 shillings. On the same race there was also a sharp edge or sickle mill and a fulling mill, and on the opposite bank was a fleecing mill. Both the corn mill and sickle mill were bought by the Wakefield family in about 1750. In 1760 John Wakefield built a woollen mill situated on what is now the reception car park of Croppers. This mill quickly became a very successful business bringing in about £2000 in the 1760's.

 

Following the success of the woollen mill John Wakefield set about a programme of expansion and change. He converted the sickle mill to a corn mill, and included a preparation plant for his newly built cotton mill in 1770. The cotton mill was extended with the new machinery after 1770 but proved to be uneconomic due to the competition from the Lancashire mills. To make matters worse the woollen mill lost trade with Yorkshire competition and, following their war of independence in 1776, also with the American market.

 

In 1828 the Wakefields leased the cotton mill to Hudson and Foster who installed a second-hand paper machine. The trio also installed a machine at the Cowan Head mill, a few miles upstream from Burneside.

 

Cowan Head Mill was also part of the Cropper's business complex until its closure in 1977. The history of the mill is a little less elaborate than that of Burneside. In 1735 it is known that a fulling mill existed in Cowan Head. Thomas Ashburner, a local publisher who started "The Kendal Weekly Mercury" (later "The Agreeable Miscellany"), bought the fulling mill in 1746 and converted it to make paper. James Ashburner took over the business and eventually the mill passed to the Wilson family.

 

In 1845 James Cropper rented the Burneside Mill from the Wakefield family, and the Cowan Head Mill from the Wilsons. In 1854 Cowan Head was bought, and in 1880 Bowston Mill, between Burneside and Cowan Head, was also purchased. Bowston Mill may well have begun life as a fulling mill, but a new building was constructed to prepare rags and ropes for the other two mills. Bowston Mill was closed in the early 1960s when waste paper rather than rags was used in the paper pulp.

 

The development of the Cropper's business was not without incident. In 1886 Burneside Mill was destroyed by fire. The cost of rebuilding was high and probably resulted in the freehold acquisition from the Wakefield family. A further incident occurred in 1893 when the Cowan Mill chimney blew down killing three workers.

 

The history of water power at the various sites is a long one. Water power was used in part of the process of paper manufacture at Cowan Head from 1750 to the early 1970s. In 1854 a Thompson's Patent Vortex Turbine was installed to replace the waterwheel. Alterations occurred in the 1930s, and two turbines were put in place which developed 110 and 200 horsepower. These turbines, however, did not provide sufficient power, and at a public enquiry in the 1970s the company failed to get reduced water charges from the water authority so the turbines were taken out of commission and alternative power was used. At Burneside there was a 300 hp turbine which was removed in about 1970 when the plant was modernised.

 

Other power was provided by the installation of Lancashire boilers in 1899 at Cowan Head, which were still in use in 1977. In 1919 a steam turbine was installed at Burneside which produced power for lighting the mill and provided electricity for the village. The possibility of supplying power to Kendal was also discussed but was ruled out.

 

The Cropper's paper business is now concentrated at Burneside, but when all three mills were in use the transport problem was solved by the construction of a narrow gauge tramway linking the sites in 1879. The tramway was replaced in 1927 by a standard gauge line, built using rails captured from the Turks in the First World War. This railway was linked to the Windermere - Oxenholme branch line. The line was operated originally by a petrol engine called 'Rachel' which was replaced by a diesel 'Rushton' in 1951. The railway brought in all the raw materials, including pulp, dyes, chemicals and coal, and sent out paper products. The line was closed between Burneside and Cowan Head in 1965, but the siding to Burneside was used for coal for a few more years.  James Cropper Plc currently produces a wide range of specialist paper products, supplying about 30% in rolls and 70% as sheets. Products include packaging boxes, coloured envelopes and paper, hardback book covers, watermarked and laid papers, printing and writing papers.

 

FURTHER READING The leaves we write on - James Cropper, a history in paper making : Mark Cropper, Ellergreen Press, 2004.  There is an excellent review of the book and more history at http://www.soue.org.uk/souenews/issue7/leaves.html

 

Photos of the apartments at Cowan Head, north of Kendal, on the site of the old paper mill.

 

Front cover of the book 'The Leaves We Write On' the history of Cowan Head and Burneside paper mills.