Cumpston Research

The best products at the best prices!

Watson Cumpston death cert Trinity House Hull lloyds ship Voilier withernsea pier

[Ernest] Idris Cumpstone's War story

b. 1898 died aged 96.

Shrop 5 1/1/2/4/ Ernest Edward Cumpstone deceased.  Brother of Edith May Cumpstone deceased.  Married Elizabeth Ballard Glamorgan Yeomanry cavalry then Welsh Regiment

    1874 Shiffnal 6a 632 Birth Free BMD Jun Q 1874.  1881 Stottesden 6 yrs

   scholar census 1881.  Marriages Jun 1897  Merthyr T.  11a 906

 

 1st Child:

      Shrop 5 1/1/2/4/1/ Ernest Idris Cumpstone 77 yrs nephew of Edith May

      1898 Llantrisant 11a 568 Pontypridd [who married Elizabeth Griffiths] birth Jun Q

       Marriages Mar 1926  Merthyr T.  11a 913.  Joined Glamorganshire Yeomanry [cavalry]

       but transferred to the Welsh Regiment [Infantry].  

IDRIS CUMPSTONE'S WAR STORY IN THE WELSH REGIMENT MUSEUM, CARDIFF CASTLE - HIS OWN ACCOUNT

 

March 6th 1918 and we were occupying a point in the Palestine Campaign knows as Dodd's Hill.  We had relieved a London Regiment here a few days previously.

 

On this particular night we were ordered to attack the Turks who were holding a position facing us, known as Lemon Hill.  Towards midnight we had crept within bayonet charging distance when the Turks discovered us.  They opened fire and then fled.  Our losses, one stretcher bearer killed.  At daybreak on March 7th we moved forward to the next hill.  Another company had passed through and we were lying in close support.  The day was fairly quiet, machine gun and rifle fire was coming in from the flanks, yet I was not very happy.  We had come a long way from Gaza, Beirsheba, Bethlehem and Jerusalem and with the Turks at breaking point and the 7th March being my twentieth birthday I wonder!!!!

 

The light began to fade and then it came, just as I was beginning to feel safe - the bullet entered my shoulder and I sank to my knees.  There was a cry for a stretcher bearer, I felt faint but held on, then I was whisked away quickly to safety under a rock.  My breathing by this time was particularly bad and I was coughing up blood.  There was no exit to the bullet.  I drank all the water my pals had issued to them, and who visited me during the hours of darkness.  I now had to wait to be picked up by the R.A.M.C. from the advanced field dressing station.

 

Towards midnight I saw approaching my shelter and to this day I cannot understand why these three R.A.M.C. men carried a lamp.  They put me on a stretcher, but I had to sit up in order to breathe and spit up blood.  How the Turks did not see the reflection from the lamp I still question myself.  The Whiz Bangs kept following us.  The bearers would put me down and dive for shelter.  It was a nightmare journey which took hours, winding in and out of the hills.  At day break we arrived at the dressing station.  I was given an anti-tetanus injection and continued my journey by mule cart to Jerusalem.

 

The hospital turned out to be an Italian School and was manned by R.A.M.C. Staff.  'Do it yourself' was the rule there and I had to crawl around as best I could.  My wound was dressed and healing in a week or so.  A doctor who arrived there made enquiries as to how I felt and said he had no equipment to hand and I was to let him know when I felt I could make the journey to Lud or Lydda as it is now called.  In the meantime I was dosed with Morphia tablets.

 

Towards the end of the month I decided to try the journey to Lud.  The roads were very rough and I found it very painful, but in a few days we landed at the 15th General Hospital in Alexandria and there I was given an x-ray to locate the bullet.  This was found by a Captain Wright who drew a diagram of my left shoulder.  People seemed very interested in me, wanting to know how I felt and so on.  Later Matron visited me with similar enquiries and asked for the address of my mother as she intended writing to her.  Soon afterwards I learned that the bullet had lodged in my heart.  The diagram drawn by the Captain  was sheer bluff.

 

Anxious days and nights followed with everyone being most kind and a night nurse whose home town was Bristol being particularly attentive.  News came that the 15th General Staff were leaving for  Salonica and that I was being transferred to England, so I was sent first to the 21st General Hospital where a buxom Australian Sister told me that she was going to build me up so that I could face the journey in the first Hospital Ship available.  This ship was the Dunluce Castle.  I felt the benefit of her building up until a Chaplain visited me and asked if I was prepared to meet my God.  When I told him I was not, he replied that I was a very sick person and I should be.  This made me feel that the Chaplain had information that I had not been given.  I was in a very shocked state.

 

My companion on the Hospital Ship the Dunluce Castle was a Londoner named Jolly who had lost both eyes.  How he could be jolly in name and nature was beyond me.  He sang most of the day through the voyage home.

 

A few days after leaving Alexandria I made an effort to lower myself on to the floor and climb the four or five stops to the deck.  This without the doctor knowing.  Each day brought new life and strength, walking on the deck in the sea air.  The doctor who visited me during my absence was amazed when he discovered me on the deck.  I managed to walk to the x-ray department where the staff enjoyed looking at the bullet ticking away with my heart beat.  One of the doctors advised me strongly not to allow anyone to operate on me.  "Someone might be mad enough to try" he said.  He also advised me to take up my civilian job once I had been discharged from the army and to forget - FORGET - the bullet.  "Of course" he said "you know where it is".

 

On arriving at Avonmouth, very excited to be back home again, we were given the choice of Hospital trains.  No. 1 and 2 bound for London and Netley.  I chose no. 3 bound for Bristol, this being nearer my home and was taken to the 2nd Southern General Hospital, South Mead.  I tried to telephone home but this liberty was allowed to officers only.  I had to be satisfield with sending a post card to inform them people at home of my arrival.  Pa and Ma and Grandad Ballard arrived the following day a little apprehensive as to what the surgeon would tell them.

 

Throughout that summer of 1918 I was continually x-rayed, but though I expected to be questioned about an operation, no one suggested it.  One morning Captain Short, the Surgeon, visited me at the hospital and told me that it had been interesting having me at the hospital but there was nothing else he could do for me so I could take my discharge anytime.  I left the army on the 18th August 1918.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This story was sent to me by Bert Cumpstone in Wales about his relative.  

 

 

 

 

LETTER DATED 17 APRIL 1959 FROM T STENNER EVANS, SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL OFFICER, WELSH HOSPITAL BOARD, THE TEMPLE OF HEALTH AND PEACE, CATHAYS PARK TO IDRIS

 

Personal

 

Dear Idris

 

I want to thank you very much for coming down to Church Village yesterday.  The large assembly of doctors there were most interested as they saw something that they are not likely to see ever again.  You may possibly recollect that in 1927 I  showed you to a collection of doctors in Merthyr Tydfil - the fathers of several doctors who saw you yesterday.

 

When you come down to Cardiff as you sometimes do, drop in to the Temple of Health and Peace and come and have a chat with me.

 

I am enclosing a trifle to cover your expenses,

with kind regards

 

Yours sincerely

 

T STENNER EVANS

 

 

Mr Idris Cumpstone

4 The Villas

Fochriw

Bargoed

Glam.

 

TSE/GEL

 

 

 

Top photo is of Idris in his Army uniform.

 

Second photo is of his parents Ernest Edward Cumpstone and Elizabeth Ballard on their engagement.  They married in 1897.

JERUSALEM 

 

In 1917 after the Battle of Jerusalem, the British Army, led by General Edmund Allenby, captured the city,[71] and in 1922, the League of Nations at the Conference of Lausanne entrusted the United Kingdom to administer the Mandate for Palestine.

 

LOD

 

Lod (Hebrew: לוֹד‎; Arabic: اَلْلُدّْ‎, al-Ludd; Greco-Latin Lydda) is a city located on the Sharon Plain 15 kilometers (9 mi) southeast of Tel Aviv in the Center District of Israel

ALEXANDRIA

 

Alexandria (Arabic: الإسكندرية) is the second-largest city in Egypt, and is the country's largest seaport, serving about 80% of Egypt's imports and exports.

 

In July 1882 the city came under bombardment from British naval forces and was occupied.

DUNLUCE CASTLE,

 

The ship's log for the DUNLUCE CASTLE, used as a hospital ship during the war, is available at the National Archives.

 

2nd Southern General Hospital, South Mead.

 

'The last change in the general character of the and Southern General Hospital came in the spring of 1918, when the large Southmead section was converted into a special centre for orthopedic treatment. A majority of the beds were reserved for these special surgical cases, and by the end of the year the Military Authorities decided to make the hospital a separate establishment, and detach it from the 2nd Southern. On January 1st, 1919, it ceased to be the Southmead section and became the Special Military Surgical Hospital, under the command of Lieut.-Colonel A. Milne Thomson, C.M.G., until the autumn of 1919, when the hospital was closed and the patients transferred to the hospital under the control of the Ministry of Pensions at Bath.'

 

You can read the full history of the hospital here.

 T. Stenner Evans. LETTER TO THE BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL 1957

 

Thyroid Disorders in the Newborn

SIR,-The paper on thyroid disorders in the newborn by

Drs. I. D. Riley and G. Sclare (Journal, April 27, p. 979)

brought to my mind the case of a former patient of mine, aged 30 years, who in 1924 suffered from a large adenomatous goitre for which she refused any kind of treatment. On two occasions I delivered this woman of a male child; each was born with a well-marked goitre, but each was stillborn.

From the size of the goitre I believe there is little doubt that the cause of death in each case was respiratory obstruction from pressure by a nodular goitre. This observation appears to support the views held by Drs. Riley and Sclare, and by the other observers mentioned; furthermore, it strengthens the view that heredity and iodine deficiency are possible factors in the production of the condition. It is interesting to recall that I took a photograph of one ofthe stillborn children, which showed very clearly the outlineof the goitre, and sent it to Sir Thomas Dunhill (then Mr. T. P. Dunhill), of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, who was greatly interested.-I am, etc.,

Cardiff. T. STENNER EVANS.

 

MAY 18, 1957 CORRESPONDENCE MEDICAR 1183

http://www.bmj.com/

YOU CAN ALSO READ ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT IDRIS AT THE FOCHRIW WEBSITE TOGETHER WITH A PHOTO OF THE BULLET http://www.fochriwhistory.co.uk/page272.htm

SEE THE EULOGY OF HIS BROTHER DOUG CUMPSTONE