Cumpston Research

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THE POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE PROJECT

Convenor: Hugh Compston, Cardiff University, UK

This project is designed to encourage colleagues to systematically apply the theories and methods of political science to the task of identifying politically viable long-term state strategies for mitigating climate change that would be effective enough to prevent catastrophic climate change.

Although their inside knowledge means that politicians and other stakeholders in the policy process are in many ways the best placed to identify these, so far they have failed to do so. In these circumstances it is up to political scientists to use our different conceptual perspectives and analytical methods to do what we can to help.

ACTIVITIES

Our main activities comprise organizing panels and workshops, and collaborating on tightly coordinated book projects.

Climate Policy Strategies#2, April 2008 (Hugh Compston). This is a summary of the best ideas that I have come across so far. If you know of any other ideas, I would be most interested to hear from you.

Turning Down the Heat, edited by Hugh Compston and Ian Bailey (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). This provides a broad-ranging review of the contemporary politics of climate policy in affluent democracies, focusing in particular on identifying political strategies that may enable governments to make major cuts in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while avoiding significant political damage.

The Politics of Climate Policy, edited by Hugh Compston, Special Book Issue of Environmental Politics, 2009. This analyses the nature of climate policy politics in affluent democracies from a number of different theoretical angles in order to improve our understanding of which political strategies would be likely to enable national governments to make deep cuts in GHG emissions while avoiding significant political damage.

Workshop on the Politics of Climate Change, ECPR Joint Sessions, Rennes, 11-16 April 2008.

Papers at ECPR General Conference, Pisa, 6-8 September 2007.

From The Times August 18, 2004

Leverhulme Awards
The Trustees have approved the following awards to individuals under schemes administered by their Research Awards Advisory Committee:

Research Fellowships

Hugh Compston PhD, Senior Lecturer in Politics, Cardiff University, Long-term trends and the future of public policy;

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/court_and_social/article470965.ece

Dr. Hugh Compston PHd. Cardiff University, School of European Studies Wales

TURNING DOWN THE HEAT The Politics of Climate Policy in Affluent Democracies
Authors: Hugh Compston Ian Bailey
From Palgrave Macmillan Pub date: Dec 2008 288 pages Size 5 1/2 x 8 1/4
$37.00 - Paperback (0-230-20205-5) Also available: $110.00 Hardcover (0-230-20204-7)

Explores political strategies for governments that wish to take stronger action on climate change.

Author Bio
HUGH COMPSTON is a Reader in the Department of Politics, Cardiff School of European Studies, Cardiff University, UK, and has written extensively on public policy and policy-making. Recent publications include King Trends and the Future of Public Policy (2006), and Handbook of Public Policy in Europe: Britain, France and Germany (edited, 2004).

Current research

The Politics of Climate Policy. This project is aimed at identifying political strategies that would make it easier for national governments to make further and deeper cuts in greenhouse gas emissions while avoiding significant political damage.

Selected Publications - Policy Networks and Policy Change (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming 2009). Explores the extent to which policy network theory can be developed into a theory of policy change that can be used to illuminate the likely future of public policy in affluent European democracies.

Turning Down the Heat: The Politics of Climate Policy in Affluent Democracies (edited with Ian Bailey) (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). This book identifies political strategies that make it easier for governments to make major cuts in greenhouse gas emissions while avoiding significant political damage through a broad-ranging analysis of the politics of climate policy in affluent democracies and at the EU level.

“The Future of Public Policy”, World Futures, 2008. Summarises the findings of the research reported in full in King Trends and the Future of Public Policy below.
King Trends and the Future of Public Policy (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). Synoptic account of the directions in which public policy is being pushed by major long-term technological, economic, environmental and social trends (king trends).

Handbook of Public Policy in Europe: Britain, France and Germany (edited) (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). The first comprehensive and comparative account of the nature and content of public policy in Britain, France and Germany.

‘Beyond Corporatism: A Configurational Theory of Policy Concertation’, European Journal of Political Research Vol. 42, 2003, pp.809-831. Explains policy concertation in terms of the changing configurations of the existence or non-existence of a relevant problem, the degree of economic agreement among the relevant political actors, and the capacity of these actors to implement their sides of bargains.

Research Unit European Governance, Identity & Public Policy

ABOUT THE CONVENOR - by himself.

Hugh Compston is a Reader in the Department of Politics, School of European Studies, Cardiff University, UK. My background is in public policy and before that political economy, and I have extensive experience of organizing collaborative projects and obtaining research grants. I became involved in investigating the politics of climate policy in 2006 when I discovered that relatively little academic research was being done on identifying political strategies that might enable national governments to take more effective action to reduce GHG emissions while avoiding serious political damage.

The Politics of Climate Policy (edited), Special Book Issue of Environmental Politics, 2009. Analyses the nature of climate policy politics in affluent democracies from a number of different theoretical angles in order to improve our understanding of which political strategies would be likely to enable national governments to make deep cuts in GHG emissions while avoiding significant political damage.

Policy Networks and Policy Change (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). Tests propositions about the future of public policy, including climate policy, derived using policy network theory. Research funded by an ESRC grant.

Turning Down The Heat: The Politics of Climate Policy in Affluent Democracies, edited with Ian Bailey (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008). A broad-ranging review of the contemporary politics of climate policy in affluent democracies, focusing on identifying political strategies that may enable governments to make major cuts in greenhouse gas emissions while avoiding significant political damage.

The Future of Public Policy, World Futures 64(1), 2008. Summary of findings of King Trends book (below).

King Trends and the Future of Public Policy International (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006). Uses policy network theory to construct a synoptic account of the directions in which major long-term technological, economic, environmental and social trends are pushing public policy in Europe. Includes analyses of energy policy and climate change policy. Funded by a Leverhulme Research Fellowship.

Handbook of Public Policy in Europe: Britain, France and Germany (edited) (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). The first and only comprehensive account of the nature and content of public policy in these countries.

"Beyond Corporatism: A Configurational Theory of Policy Concertation", European Journal of Political Research, 42/6, 2003.

Policy Concertation and Social Partnership: Lessons for the 21st Century (edited with Stefan Berger) (Oxford: Berghahn, 2002). Funded by a grant from the EU.

"Union Power, Policy-Making and Unemployment in Western Europe, 1972-1993", Comparative Political Studies, 30(6), 1997.

The New Politics of Unemployment: Radical Policy Initiatives in Western Europe (edited) (London: Routledge, 1996).
http://www.greenpolitics-ecpr.org/gpsg_wiki/pmwiki.php?n=Main.AboutTheConvenor

Major Long-Term Technological, Economic, Environmental and Social Trends and the Future of Public Policy in EU Countries
Insight into the likely future of public policy is a valuable asset for politicians, civil servants and others involved in the policy process. This study suggests that the 'default' future for public policy in the United Kingdom and the European Union’s other wealthier member-states will combine more business-friendly policies with increasingly liberal social and employment policies, more women-friendly policies and a more stringent approach to climate issues, law enforcement and security.

In previous work Dr Hugh Compston of Cardiff University, the author of this study, used one of the main theories of policy-making today, policy network theory, to identify the implications for public policy of 19 particularly significant trends - which he designated, king trends - that are operating in Britain and other rich European Union nations. Policy network theory holds that major policy changes are caused mainly by external events affecting the views and political resources of individuals and groups involved in policy-making, and specifies how changes in their views and resources would be expected to affect policy decisions. This means that policy network theory can be used to trace the future policy implications of predictable sequences of events - trends - that affect the views and political resources of members of policy networks. King trends are the trends whose existence can be convincingly verified, affect large numbers of people and can be expected to continue for at least the next 20 years or so.

continued at http://www.esrcsocietytoday.ac.uk/ESRCInfoCentre/Plain_English_Summaries/econ_performance_and_development/public_policy/RES-000-22-2147.aspx

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