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Charles Cumber Guernsey sailor b. 1836 Guernsey.

 

Can you help identify this sailor?

 

Guernsey Crew Lists index

Guernsey registered ships from those "Agreement & Crew Lists" documents that have survived.

 

CUMBER Charles Ordinary Seaman age 20  Guernsey Ship Dispatch   1857

 http://history.foote-family.com/maritime/index.htm

 

The Barque Dispatch

 

At the time of its launch, the Dispatch was the second largest ship ever built in Guernsey. She was 106 feet long, 24 feet wide, and had a full-length figure of Mercury as a figurehead. She sank off the coast of Madeira after the crew had spent five days pumping water out of the hold. A lifeboat with the master (Alfred Eastland) and five of the crew made it safely to Tenerife three days later. Two other boats containing the rest of the crew were lost.

 

Built Guernsey, 1849 Builders Marquand & De La Mare Tons 338

Owners

George Foote

Francis Lamble

Charles Henry Baskfill

John David

Mary David

Gustave Carrington

Masters

John David (1849-1855)

Clement Day (1855-1860)

John Joseph Coles (1860-1861)

Alfred Eastland (1862-1863)

Fate Sank NE Madeira, 1863

 

Details from:

http://history.foote-family.com/maritime/index.htm

I was delighted to hear from Cherie "Tobi"  Czumak

 

2011-07-26

You wanted to know about Charles Cumber, a seaman on the Dispatch.  He was my Great Grandfather (b. 1836 Guernsey) married Anna TALLENT first and then when she died after they came over to Toronto he sent for her sister Miriam TALLENT and married her also.  My Grandfather was Miriam and Charles' child Thomas Sharshaw Cumber b. 1879.  

 

 

 

 

Toronto, 1879, part 2

 

 

012631-79 Charles CUMBER, 43, widower, engine driver, of Guernsey, Toronto s/o Henry & Mary CUMBER married Miriam E.H. TALLENT, 36, of England, Toronto d/o Edgar & Eliza TALLENT wtn: Eliza TALLENT & Elija SAMSON both of Toronto. 6 May 1879

Meaning of CUMBER:

 

Middle English combren, to annoy, from Old French combrer, from combre, hindrance, from Vulgar Latin *comboros, of Celtic origin.]