Cumpston Research

The best products at the best prices!

Watson Cumpston death cert Trinity House Hull lloyds ship Voilier withernsea pier

About the Study

Please check out the origins of the CUMPSTON name and variants

 

Variants Origins of the name

 

As part of my research I aim to consider the following issues, and collect the supporting data.  Items in bold are complete: 

 

  • A survey to establish the size of the proposed study identified the British Isles, Australia, Canada and the USA as the main countries that need to be researched.  

  • Relevant surname variants are considered in some detail - see button opposite.

  • Additionally, the British 1881 Census gave a good indication of the geographical distribution of the name at the end of the 19th century - mainly Hull and the West Riding of Yorkshire, Shropshire and Staffordshire with entries for many residents showing birth place as Westmorland Cumberland or Lancashire.

  • A significant collection of Civil Registration entries from indexes of births, marriages and deaths. These include at least the entries in FreeBMD. (FreeBMD is a website that provides, free, on-line, an increasing number of Civil Registration index entries for England and Wales.)

  • A significant collection of entries in the International Genealogical Index (IGI). (This worldwide index, mainly of baptisms and marriages, varies in its coverage from place to place. Where the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS) has extracted data from parish registers, this is generally more reliable than that supplied by individuals. For Scotland, there is the similar but much more comprehensive Old Parochial Register Index.)

  • Indexes to the national censuses published to date. For the UK this ranges from 1841-1911.  The equivalent in the other countries concerned is 'work in progress'.

 

In addition, to be eligible to  transfer my registration from a Category C to either Category A or B I need to collect a substantial body of worldwide data:

 

  • The Guild takes this to mean, for countries of the world where the name is relatively significant and where resources are readily accessible, data as shown in the following list:

  •  

  • A survey of current and historical sources, to give an indication of population distribution over time, including the present day, and to establish, where relevant, any historic geographic origin(s) of the name 

  • All Civil Registration entries from indexes of births, marriages and deaths, such as those maintained by the General Register Office for England & Wales, New Register House in Edinburgh and the equivalent archives for each country concerned, where available.

  • All entries in the International Genealogical Index and Vital Record Indexes. Wherever possible, these should be used to refer back to the original source entries, so that a substantial body of entries can be obtained from the relevant parish registers for the area(s) concerned.

  • Indexes to the national censuses published to date. In particular, reference should be made, where appropriate, to the indexes to the 1881 and 1901 censuses for Great Britain, and the 1880 census for the USA, and others that become readily available. Wherever possible, these should be used to refer back to the original source entries. This will help in reconstructing family groups and to indicate past population distribution.

  • All entries from major published probate indexes of Wills and Administrations. The references in these to other family members should again help in reconstructing family groups.

  • Other readily available indexes and records such as those for Baptisms, Marriages, Burials and Monumental Inscriptions (MI).

 

The Guild believes that the well-run one-name study will cover - possibly at various times - all of the "seven pillars of wisdom" listed below:

  •  

  • Data collection

  • Analysis

  • Synthesis

  • Publicising the study

  • Responding to enquiries

  • Publication of results

  • Preserving the study

 

Data Collection

 

As a one-namer, I will collect any data that I come across mentioning my registered surnames, and keep a note of the source of the data.

 

Data collection is the first and probably most arduous part of a one-name study.          One-Namers use the same data sources as other genealogists, but perhaps in different ways. Ordinary family history tends to be convergent: you focus in on finding your specific ancestors and collateral connections. In contrast, one-name studies tend to be divergent: each new reference may open up a new area of enquiry. Guild registered studies are also worldwide, so the scope is potentially enormous.

 

Whether I investigate individuals or specific family groups, I use the same sources, but in order to capture the scope of my one-name study I will explore as much indexed material as possible. Indexes, together with "calendars", resumes and some directories are termed meta-data, or data pointing to data.

 

With traditional family history we are encouraged always to check out the original primary data. Ideally, one-namers would do the same, but the large scale of many studies precludes this, so one-namers often focus on meta-data and other secondary data compiled by others.

 

Furthermore, with traditional ancestor-hunting, the search goes cold if you can't prove the next generation back, whereas a one-name study will take an interest in the continuous presence of a name irrespective of whether the references can be assembled into family groups.

 

In researching a relatively rare surname, I have been fortunate to find that much of my research relates to my direct ancestral line.

 

 

Guild of One Name Studies

No. 3797

 A NOTE ABOUT THE COLOUR CODING THROUGHOUT THE SITE

 

On each page I have placed the data in boxes.  

 

Yellow boxes refer to the person at the top of the page or births.  

 

Each individual child has a different coloured box.

 

Parents of the main subject will be in a cream box.

 

Where possible I have added photographs.  TO ENLARGE just double click on the individual photo.

RED BOXES ARE QUERIES, PROBLEMS OR UNMATCHED PEOPLE AWAITING A HOME!

Marriages are in PINK boxes

Deaths are in GREEN boxes

A NOTE ON WHERE TO FIND PEOPLE ON THE WEB SITE

 

THE QUICKEST WAY IS TO USE THE GOOGLE SEARCH ENGINE ON THE WELCOME PAGE.

 

IN ADDITION:

 

1.  Each American can be found underneath the USA DATA tab, organised under each state.  The state is chosen because they were either born or died there, or some notable part of their lives was lived in the state.

 

2.  Details of all wills can be found under Documents.

 

3.  The majority of people with proven trees can be found under CUMPSTON LIVES.

 

4.  People not yet identified on a tree can be found under the STRAYS HELP tab.  People inn the USA can be found under the USA strays tab

 

 

READ MORE ABOUT HOW THE DATA IS ORGANISED ON THE SITE AND THE MAIN FAMILY LINES